60 Days of Crossfit – A Skeptic’s Review

Woman and Bar

CrossFit. Saying the word evokes two kinds of responses. One is the wide-eyed stare of awe accompanied by OMG, I heard that is SO hard! The other is the sneering sort of disdain where they roll their eyes and insist CrossFit is a cult for meat-heads. There’s even a phrase for the latter referring to its cultish following: Drinking the Crossfit Kool-Aid.

I fell somewhere in between the two responses above. Clients often asked me what I thought of it and I always replied that I heard it was good but that everyone I know who tried it had also been injured. I wrote it off as another fad and intended to stick safely within the comfort zone of my typical (ineffective) workout.

So how then did I talk myself into trying CrossFit?

I mentioned in a previous post how I fell off the fitness wagon for about 18 months.

Fast forward through the general stresses of life like moving back and forth across town a few times, a couple of breakups, a nearly empty summer client schedule, dwindling funds, and lack of exercise, and I have to admit I put on a few pounds. Well, ok, more than a few. Even worse, my energy was lacking, my strength was waning, and the depression demons were starting to eye my growing discontent greedily.

Determined to get my body and my health back, I tried a few things. Group-based tabata training was fun for a while but the repetitive plyometrics on a concrete floor led to an injury that still bothers me nearly a year later. Personal training and group fitness through my gym was good at first, but I quickly plateaued and got bored. A co-worker suggested I give CrossFit a try. I even did the thing where I rolled my eyes and spouted a few excuses. “Yeah, but it leads to injury. Yeah, but they do gymnastics and stuff and I can’t do that. Yeah, but I don’t want to work out with a bunch of over-zealous meat-heads.” The truth is, I had no experience with CrossFit and was basing these opinions entirely on hearsay.

Haters gonna hate

Haters gonna hate

I justified starting not for myself, but because I would then have an honest opinion to give those who asked me about it. I researched a few gyms (they call them boxes) and put out some inquiries. Voodoo CrossFit 512 in northwest Austin was the first to respond in a timely manner so I begrudgingly went to check it out.

Join me at Voodoo!

Join me at Voodoo!

I’m not going to lie. I was scared. I was afraid I was too out of shape, that I would embarrass myself attempting to do olympic lifts, handstands and ring dips. Within two weeks though, I was hooked. Here’s why.

1. Every workout (WOD – workout of the day) is different. Boom! No more boredom!

2. Every day you look at the WOD with shifty eyes and think there’s no way you can get through it. An hour later you leave feeling elated because you DID do it!

3. You become more competent and confident in what your body can achieve every week.

4. You work out your brain too as you assimilate new technique and form. Neuroplasticity y’all. It keeps you young.

5. It inspires a healthier diet. You will begin to notice how your food affects your workout. Indulging will make you feel sluggish, bloaty and nauseated while eating well allows you to conquer your workout and still have energy left over to complete your day.

6. You instantly gain a new family. The community aspect of CrossFit is always talked up and I’m learning that it’s truth. Turn to anyone to ask for help and it is given, take motivation and strength as people cheer you on to finish, gain renewed energy when, dripping with sweat and barely able to stand, someone offers you a high five with a beaming smile and tells you what a great job you did. Plus, this is a huge bonus when you need strong people to help you move.

Voodoo Dolls April & Jenny help each other out at a competition.

Voodoo Dolls April & Jenny help each other out at a competition.

7. You gain a dozen new role models. I thought everyone would be chiseled and intimidating but you walk in and see men and women of all different shapes and sizes totally kicking ass. It erases the stigma that you have to have a flawless body and 8-pack abs to be strong and fit. These are ordinary people achieving extraordinary things.

Starting to sound pretty good right? Not as scary as you thought? To be fair, it’s not all sunshine and roses and there is a flip-side.

1. You MUST know your limits. Body awareness is a key factor so that you can identify when you may be lifting too heavy, your form isn’t quite right, or you are teetering on the edge of overexertion. Someone new to exercise may not know the difference and could be more prone to injury.

Crossfit Fail

What I fear will happen every time I pick up the bar

2. You will doubt yourself. Staring at the bar thinking holy shit how am I going to manage this? is your opportunity to overcome. All movements can be scaled and as long as you don’t quit, you win!

3. There is a learning curve. Besides a whole new vocabulary (AMRAP, EMOM, WOD, WTF?), it takes time and repetition to learn these highly technical skills. Ask for help, again and again, and again, and again some more (sorry, Scott!).

4. It’s hot. There’s no A/C in the box so if you are prone to heat exhaustion this may be a limiting factor for you. Get used to sweat dripping from your nose, your hair, and down the crack of your butt. Take comfort in the fact that everyone is as dewey and glowing as you are.

5. It’s expensive. It is a chunk of change, but you are paying for accountability, community, self-confidence, and results. If it’s at all within your budget, it’s totally worth it.

6. Calluses, bruises, marks and scars. CrossFit is a sport, and stuff happens sometimes but no one complains and they often wear their wounds like a badge of honor.

7. Hunger. After a few weeks you will want to eat everything. Many an overheard conversation in the box starts like this “You know what sounds so good right now?”

But wait, what about the results? Oh, that’s what you’ve stuck around for? To hear my amazing transformation story? Well, I don’t have one…yet. I haven’t lost any weight, but I’d say in the past two weeks or so I am starting to notice my muscles feeling denser and more firm and my hunger is ramping up (yay, metabolism!). I err on the side of caution with my lifts so I don’t aggravate any of my previous injuries, but as my technique and strength improves I think I will develop the confidence to go heavier and harder. Many of the people I have met do have amazing transformation stories though, and it inspires me to be patient when you see what they have achieved within a year. In the meantime, I am actually enjoying my workouts and I’m happier than I have been in years.

You may love it, you may hate it, but I hope that if you have never tried it that this post inspires you to give CrossFit a shot. I still remain a bit cautious. Instead of gulping the Crossfit Kool-Aid, I’m savoring it in sips.

Titanic Crossfit

 

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