Accountability Update – Month 1

It’s been about a month since I posted about attempting to gain some accountability towards my fitness goals. So, how’s it going? Um….let’s just say I could use more time.

No, no, it hasn’t been a total disaster, but the lack of results have led me to put some new rules in place. Let’s review:

My exercise goals weren’t as realistic as I thought. I never made it to training and yoga in the same day. I always intended to do 60 minutes of cardio on Friday, but the reality was more like 35 to 40 and that was at a low intensity. The weather was really crappy here for a while so I didn’t make it outside on Saturdays very often. We had a break from dance rehearsals for a month but that will be resuming this week. And, last but not least I got nailed with a chest cold and didn’t work out for about 9 days.

My nutrition improved a smidge, but I thought I could handle an “everything in moderation” attitude. Yeah…no, I can’t.

I don’t feel like I totally failed though. Some progress was made with overall consistency and I feel like that is a good first step. Lifestyle change is trial and error and while I’m disappointed I didn’t have any changes in body composition, I set the stage for better adherence.

This month I will be trying a few new things. I started nutrition tracking again via MyFitnessPal. While it can be a pain in the ass, it helps me be aware of what I’m taking in and keeps me from thoughtlessly grazing on the goodies in the break room. Plus, after just two days, I realized how deficient I am with my protein requirements. I’m only getting about 50-60% of my goal. Huh. Who knew?

I obviously have a hard time with the length of my cardio sessions. So, I plan to keep them at just around 30 minutes, but I will commit to increasing the intensity with intervals (HIIT or Tabata) or at the very least, just a more challenging steady state. Now that the weather is warmer I find it pretty easy to get out on the weekends for at least 60 minutes of walk/jog or hiking with friends.

So, that’s the scoop after month 1. Lots more work to do but we’ll get there little by little!

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21-Day Sugar Elimination: The good, the bad, and the chubby

We all go through phases in our life where our good intentions with diet and fitness get left behind. For me, I didn’t just fall off the wagon, I took an epic swan dive off of it and then got dragged behind for a few miles. Yeah, it was that bad, or at least, it felt that way to me. I decided I needed to take charge of my diet again, especially now that I have a consistent schedule. I decided to try a 21-day sugar elimination challenge. 30 days can feel like forever, and two weeks isn’t usually long enough to see results, but 21 is pretty manageable.

The What:

No processed food, no fruit, no honey, no sugar (obviously). I grappled with the idea of whether to include grains or not and opted for occasional grains. No wheat, but I did make some savory millet muffins to satisfy my texture cravings. I also did use stevia occasionally. I made up my own rules for this challenge, however, there is an official version of the 21-Day Sugar Detox complete with guidance and meal plans here.

The Why:

My weakness is poor planning. I dread coming up with meal ideas and I absolutely loathe going to the grocery store. If all the ingredients are there and a plan is in place I have no problems with the actual cooking. The sugar detox was less about eliminating junk food like candy, soda, or donuts which I don’t eat anyway, and more about actually cooking real meals on a regular basis instead of reaching for a Lara Bar as dinner (oh, yes, I did).

The Bad:

The first few days were a little rough. I had some mild headaches and fatigue as my body made the switch from carbohydrates to fat as its primary fuel source. Meal planning and prepping was definitely an effort and I had to set aside the time to make it happen. I never made it the full 21-Days. I didn’t think about Thanksgiving when I started this challenge. This holiday isn’t that indulgent for me, but I didn’t anticipate leftovers and it fell apart quickly after that. I only survived 15 days of the challenge.

The Good:

This was so much easier than I expected. I thought my sugar cravings would turn me into something like Gollum, lurking around my kitchen, tearing food out of my cabinets looking for any morsel of chocolate I can find hissing “my precioussssss!!!” I’ve totally been there before; you probably have too. Admit it. Honestly though, I didn’t have many cravings. I found that some tea or coffee with a little stevia easily squashed the sugar monster when it started to rear its ugly head. I did have success with planning ahead and cooking real food. Usually doubling the recipe to ensure I had lots of leftovers for lunch and dinners throughout the week. Now that I know I CAN do this, it will be much easier to commit to and maintain in the future.

The Chubby:

Yeah, ok, I admit I did this a little for the weight loss. I know that eating proper whole foods is the key to having a healthy lean body and I wasn’t eating enough of it. I did lose almost 3 pounds in the 15 days I stuck to the challenge. That’s actually pretty good considering I haven’t been working out at all. It was the difference between pants that were unbearably tight, to pants that are now merely uncomfortable. Now that I have had some success with this experiment and will be starting to train again this week, I see no reason why I can’t get back to the fitter version of myself I was a year ago.

The Takeaway:

A challenge like this should never be used as a quick fix. Instead, view it as an experiment to see how your body, mind, and mood are affected when changing variables such as nutrition, fitness, or mindset. I noticed that when I did indulge in sugar again, the headaches came right back. I wasn’t expecting that but I’m glad I know that I have immediate negative reinforcement to keep me in check. I’m a little disappointed I didn’t complete the challenge, but instead of binging on cookies because I failed, I’m going to celebrate the success of my 15 days and use that to fuel the coming weeks, months and years of a healthier lifestyle. I won’t be perfect, but I’ll be a step closer. I also think a challenge like this would be good to do a few times a year to help reset any bad habits that have crept back in and keep you aware of your goals.

Changing bad habits doesn’t have to be agonizing and dreadful, but it does require effort and that effort is critical to the success of your goals. What effort will you commit to today, right now, this very moment?

How Rock Climbing Is Teaching Me About Failure (and Success!)

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It’s a long way down!

I recently tried rock climbing for the first time. Before they set you loose inside the rock gym you must pass a short course in how to use the harnesses and ropes. I will never forget the moment when  I had climbed halfway up the wall and the instructor said “Okay, now let go and fall.” I looked down, it seemed like a long, long way down, and replied “Are you kidding me?” I remained glued to the wall though my fingers were tiring and my arms beginning to tremble while the instructor coaxed me to simply let go.

I realized a couple things while I was clinging for dear life. First, it’s hard to overcome  a fear that has been ingrained in you for 35 years. Second, it’s difficult to place trust that someone will catch you. Third, that what I was feeling up there on the wall was a lot like my myriad other fears in all facets of my life.

Whatever the struggle, usually we reach a certain point where we are frozen to our wall. Too scared to go up, but even more scared to fall down. We cling to our safety zone, though we become fatigued and tired of being stuck.

When you approach an obstacle, whether it be a 30 foot rock wall or a career or fitness goal, it looks daunting. You observe, gather information, plan your route for reaching the top then tackle it with enthusiasm. Somewhere, halfway up you get stuck and panic sets in. You can let go, give up, and start again, or you can take stock of your resources. Are you using everything available to you to progress? Can you shift right or left, move even an inch up or down to provide more leverage? Does another perspective from a friend or family member offer a solution that you cannot see? 

Usually, the solution isn’t easy. It’s a reach that’s just outside of where you feel stable, a move that requires more power than you think you have left. Your only option is to give it a shot, or give up. I’ve discovered that even though it terrifies me to try, I have been able to reach that next handhold more often than not. Being on the wall is teaching me about trying harder, that you are capable of more than you think you are. Even if you fail, you can try again, and you’ll be stronger the next time. 

So what happened with the first fall I was paralyzed to take? Well, I did it, and you know what? It was kind of fun. Even though I get scared every time I climb, once I reach the top and relish that sense of accomplishment, I can let go, enjoy the smooth ride back down, then tackle the next obstacle.